Share
  
Tweet
Imatge
Montefí settlement dating from the Talayotic era was in use until the Roman era. In its heyday, it was one of the biggest settlements near the Ciutadella port.
It has the architectural and spatial features of a typical settlement of the era, closely linked to livestock breeding and farming.
Montefí settlement is unusual in not having a taula enclosure, although its presence cannot be ruled out, given the destruction this settlement has suffered down the ages. It contains the typical monuments of a talayotic settlement: talayots constructed with the cyclopean technique, necropolis with hypogeums, natural caves, storage silos, tank for collecting water, etc.

Montefí talayotic settlement

Montefí settlement dating from the Talayotic era was in use until the Roman era. In its heyday, it was one of the biggest settlements near the Ciutadella port.
It has the architectural and spatial features of a typical settlement of the era, closely linked to livestock breeding and farming.
Montefí settlement is unusual in not having a taula enclosure, although its presence cannot be ruled out, given the destruction this settlement has suffered down the ages. It contains the typical monuments of a talayotic settlement: talayots constructed with the cyclopean technique, necropolis with hypogeums, natural caves, storage silos, tank for collecting water, etc.



 
Detailed description

Settlement dating from the Talayotic era (approximately tenth century B.C.) that lasted until the Roman era (123 B.C.), although the discovery of older remains cannot be discounted. What can be seen today is a series of buildings and spaces constructed to meet the requirements and day-to-day activities of a group of people closely linked to livestock breeding and farming. Records show that it must have been one of the largest settlements in the area of the port of Ciutadella. Unusually, it does not have a taula enclosure, although given the archaeological stratigraphy in the fields nearby and the destruction it has undergone over time, the presence of one cannot be ruled out.

The Island Council bought the estate with FEDER funds from the European Union. It includes 43,187 m2 and contains the most characteristic monuments of a talayotic settlement. At present, three highly visible talayots can be observed (T1, T2 and T3, in addition to another probable site), because at least one was destroyed when the Maó-Ciutadella road was built. The northernmost talayot has an apse-shaped floor plan with a monumental concave façade. The western talayot is characterised by the giant size of the stones with which it was built.

The southern circular construction has a corridor around a solid central block that on one side seems to climb to an upper storey and on the other to give access to an indeterminate part of the central block. The internal layout cannot be clearly observed because some of the stonework has collapsed, but it seems an intervention here would reveal an interesting architectural structure.

Tradition has it that there used to be many structural remains occupying the large area between the talayots, now no longer visible because of agricultural activity over the last fifty years.

The site also has also an important necropolis of hypogeums (twelve according to historical sources), but today almost all are closed and filled with sediment. Six have been identified, and there are two other possible sites.

The largest is located 200 m to the east of the southern talayot. It has an access corridor (3.60 m long and 1.10 m wide) that retains remains of its roof. The chamber is polylobed, and six separate spaces can be distinguished. With a quadrangular section free-standing column to one side, it was originally used as a funerary space.

All over the surface of the archaeological area fragments of Talayotic, Carthaginian and Roman pottery were observed.

During works on the Southern Ring Road in 2005, an urgent archaeological dig was ordered on this section of the Camino Vell which revealed a storage and production area from the Talayotic era consisting of various elements hewn from the solid rock: seventeen silos, eight cisterns, several sections, channels and holes, some with roof slabs, and post holes or impressions of structures that would have supported porches or roofs. Other items uncovered included walls from the Roman Era and a funerary hypogeum from Naviform I (1750-1400 B.C.), without any archaeological sediment. The whole area has been covered and protected for its recovery after completion of the new access of this path.

In volume IV (page 92) of his Geography and History of Minorca, Mascaró Passarius mentioned nineteen perforated shells found on this site and preserved in the Francesc Pons Roca collection at Ciutadella.

Classification:
Talayotic settlement

Municipality:
Ciutadella.

Chronological period:
Talayotic Era (tenth century B.C.) - Roman Era (123 B.C.).

Objects found:
- Pottery from the Talayotic, Carthaginian and Roman eras

Constructions:
- Cisterns for collecting water
- Talayots
- Hypogeums
- Storage silos

 
Archaeological interventions

In 2000 various archaeological digs took place, in the form of geophysical prospecting and five archaeological soundings. In 2006 there was an urgent excavation of the Camino Vell at Ciutadella, during construction of the Southern Ring Road, which exposed an important archaeological area which was later protected and covered.
In 2014 one of the settlement’s talayots was restored.

 
Legal protections

BIC no. of the Island Council of Minorca: 000334?BIC no. of the Balearic Islands Government: 7015-2-2-51-001701-0
BIC no. of the Ministry of Culture: R-I-51-0003307-00000?no. Decree 2563/1966, of 10 September: 1673

 
Bibliography

DE NICOLÁS, J.C. & CONDE, M.J. 1993. La ceràmica ibèrica pintada a les Illes Balears i Pitiüses. Col·lecció Recerca 3. Maó: Institut Menorquí d’Estudis.

HERRANZ, M.I. & LEÓN, M.J. 2007. Excavació arqueològica de la ronda sud. Consell Insular de Menorca. LPHC 3.

 
Practical information

Access:
The Montefí settlement is set at kilometre 42 next to the Me-1 main Maó to Ciutadella road. Access is along the southern side, by the Camino Vell at Ciutadella.
Signed from the road.
Open to the general public.


Parking:
None.

Visits:
Entry free with uninterrupted timetable.
Information panels on site.

Ownership and management:
Island Council of Minorca. Acquired with funds from the European Union FEDER scheme.

 

 
 
 
Consell Insular de Menorca Govern Illes Balears
MINORCA TALAYOTIC - World Heritage Nomination
HOME  |  CONTACT  |  LEGAL TERMS  |  XHTML 1.0  |  CSS 2.1  |  RSS