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The Binissafullet talayotic settlement was in use from the tenth century B.C. on, particularly during the fourth to the third centuries B.C., although remains from the Islamic era indicate that it may have been inhabited until the mediaeval era.
Binissafullet preserves the characteristic elements of a talayotic settlement: a talayot, a taula enclosure, a hypostyle hall, dwellings, remains of silos etc.
The taula, the site’s central element, had collapsed but was restored and placed upright in 1990.
Different excavations have provided a great deal of information on the use of and activities on the headland. The remains of amphoras from the Carthaginian era containing wine and meat, and the presence of fire in the taula enclosure indicates that rituals were held here in connection with the fertility of animals, crops and people.
All the remains recovered during archaeological excavations are preserved in the Museum of Minorca.

Binissafullet talayotic settlement

The Binissafullet talayotic settlement was in use from the tenth century B.C. on, particularly during the fourth to the third centuries B.C., although remains from the Islamic era indicate that it may have been inhabited until the mediaeval era.
Binissafullet preserves the characteristic elements of a talayotic settlement: a talayot, a taula enclosure, a hypostyle hall, dwellings, remains of silos etc.
The taula, the site’s central element, had collapsed but was restored and placed upright in 1990.
Different excavations have provided a great deal of information on the use of and activities on the headland. The remains of amphoras from the Carthaginian era containing wine and meat, and the presence of fire in the taula enclosure indicates that rituals were held here in connection with the fertility of animals, crops and people.
All the remains recovered during archaeological excavations are preserved in the Museum of Minorca.



 
Detailed description

The Binissafullet talayotic settlement occupies an area of approximately 6,000 m2.

Practically in the centre is a circular talayot, with a diameter of approximately 15 m.

The best conserved part is the western part, 2.80 m high. It seems to have been built with back-to-back dry stone walls, following the construction technique seen in other talayots like Torre d’en Galmés and Biniparratx Petit. Much of the talayot’s eastern face has been dismantled, used as a source of stones, many of which were broken up to make gravel. It is probable that the remains on the top of the monument are the remains of its original room.

To the east of the talayot is a hypostyle hall approximately half of which, except for the northern part, has been preserved. Part of the roof is extant, supported by three pilasters topped by large horizontal stones, placed across each other. The interior has maximum width of 5 m.

To the west of the talayot is the taula enclosure, discovered thanks to deforestation works in 1988. Between February and March 1990 the enclosure was excavated and the taula restored to its original setting.

The taula enclosure is atypical: unlike most taula sanctuaries of Minorca, it is a square building with rounded corners. This is because it was built against the wall of a pre-existing building and also due to restructuration over time. Another feature is the taula’s pillar, which as in many talayotic houses of the late Post Talayotic era, rests on a stone support or base. It has a recess on which the pilaster rests (the only taula in Minorca with this feature). On each side are two lateral stones of the same height with flat upper faces, in the form of baetylus.

Behind the taula are two small but differentiated spaces. To the east are the remains of two hearths, one circular and the other with no structured border.

The excavation brought to light some very interesting information on the activities carried out in this holy building:
- Presence -consumption of wine, with many fragments of Carthaginian amphora intentionally broken, accumulating mainly behind the taula.
- Presence-consumption of young lambs and kids, with piles of bones beside the pilasters hewn out of the rock.
- A large, fast-burning fire, with very white ashes.

To the talayot’s north is where most architectural structures can be found: a 9 m long wall built from large stones, isolated and not attached to the structures around it (probably the remains of an old enclosure wall). Tank with two cavities (1.20 m deep) cut into the rock and linked by channelling, with recessing for a slab cover which has now disappeared. 3 adjoining rooms with curved walls. A possible silo beside the talayot.

Classification:
Talayotic settlement

Municipality:
Sant LLuís

Chronological period:
Middle Bronze Age - Talayotic (Iron Age)

Objects found:
- Numerous remains of Carthaginian amphoras and talayotic pottery
- Remains of sheep and goats

Constructions:
- Talayot
- House
- Taula enclosure

 
Archaeological interventions

In 1988 there was deforestation in the area. In 1990 the site was excavated and restored.

 
Legal protections

BIC no. of the Island Council of Minorca: 001253BIC no. of the Balearic Islands Government: 7052-2-2-55-2941
BIC no. of the Ministry of Culture: R-I-55-0000819Decree no. 2563/1966, of 10 September: 2095

 
Bibliography

GUAL, J.M. 1991. El poblat talaiòtic de Binissafullet Nou (Sant Lluís). Meloussa, 2: 173-179.

GUAL, J.M. & PLANTALAMOR, L. 1997. La Taula de Binisafullet. Meloussa, 4: 35-47.

ISBERT, F. 1992. Restauració i aixecament de la taula de Binisafullet. Revista de Menorca, .

ISBERT, F. 1993. La taula de Binesafullet. Una interesante restauración. Revista de Arqueología, 149: 10-15.

ORFILA, M.; SINTES, G. 1984. Estudio preliminar sobre la perduración del habitat en los conjuntos talayóticos menorquines. Mayurqa, 20: 19-47.

 
Practical information

Access:
Access by the Me-10 road from Sant Lluís to Binissafúller at km. 2.3, just before the left turn off to the development is the settlement, where the Binissafullet Vell path starts. Can be seen from the road.
Road signs to site.
Open to the general public.

Parking:
None

Visits:
Free access throughout the day.

Ownership and management:
Private ownership and management by the Island Council of Minorca.

 

 
 
 
Consell Insular de Menorca Govern Illes Balears
MINORCA TALAYOTIC - World Heritage Nomination
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